GMDSS: Some new exciting Features

In my last blog, I wrote about my experiences with BCS-GMDSS multi-channel decoder. Chris, the software author, had added some smart features in the meantime. I would like to briefly introduce some of them in loose order.

Newly introduced is a window showing “Frequency and Time Statistics”. This somewhat sober, albeit highly informative table can be spiced up a bit yourself – see the following three screenshots (double-clicking onto them shows them in full resolution):

Thes statistics table neatly lists all channels with their messages – either all (here) or Coastal Stations only. A smart feature is that it presents the data as a heatmap.

The heatmap shows clearly that 8MHz is the most productive channel. It shows also how propagation works – see fade-in and fade-out of those channels on 12MHz and 16MHz. From a DXer’s point of view, however, 2187.5kHz can be considered some of the most interesting channel. Another new window gives an overlook about all those Coastal stations received, and how often, on what channel, and when for the first/last time.

This table lists all received Coastal station with some essential data. I marked some interesting ones, from a DXer’s point of view, which were exclusively received on 2187.5kHz

Furthermore, Chris introduced a (basic) map where you can see the locations of those Coastal stations you have received – if you don’t know exactly where to locate e.g., Taman Radio or Marzara del Vallo Radio … Even better, as the map is living: double-click to a location, and a window with your logs of this Coastal is popping up!

A basic map, which can be zoomed in/out, locates all the received Coastals. Double-clicking on a location opens a window with your log of this one – here Arkhangelsk Radio.

The log is organized as a database. This opens the chance for many applications in logging, searching and presenting your logs. Many of those option are already built-in, like searching all stations within a specific time frame or matching one or more specific fields, let it be MMSI, Ship Owner or country. One special format supports that used by highly recommended dsc-list@groups.io:

Here, BCS-GMDSS software had converted some Coastal’s logs into the DSC List format (Utilities -> Export Database Search Results as DSC List). I just copied and uploaded it. Smart!

The recent version of BCS-GMDSS also supports a search option for MMSI: just double-click the wanted MMSI to open a specific Google search. In nearly all cases I tried, the first result lead straight to much more information on a handful of websites, providing e.g., location, map with position and often a photo of the vessel:

Just double-click a MMSI, and a Google search starts. Clicking onto the first result revealed a map with the postion of the “Imperious” north of Banda Aceh/Indonesia, a photo plus some additional data. So we have received this Oil Products Tanker on her way from Malaysia to Fujairah/UAE.

Finally, Chris was kind enough to respond to the request of a single, elderly gentleman and provide for the export of all data in a form that separates all possible data fields by CSVs – analogous to the official ITU publications, among others. This offers many more and very specific possibilities for search and (statistical) evaluation. The nice elderly gentleman has already tried this (“Great!”) with Access:

Here, the CSV data from nearly 30’000 messages have been imported to Access database and sorted by ship’s name.

After so much data then for writing reception reports with some nice results:

MRCC Klaipeda answered my reception report within minutes with this stunning e-QSL card …
… as also RCC Australia and …
… Valparaiso Playa Ancha Radio did. Thanks to all of them!

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