Tag Archives: Utility DX

20 MHz HF: “HackRF One” on Shortwave

world Kopie

The world is full of software-defined radio (SDR), but HackRF One has a rather unique position – thanks to its vast maximum bandwidth of 20 MHz. With an up-converter, this combination covers more than 70 percent of the whole HF range from 3 to 30 MHz. Even better: with proper software you can record and play this enormous band!

However, this stunning bandwidth is achieved by a moderate resolution of 8 bit, resulting in a dynamic range of just nearly 50 dB. Or the half of SDRs like Elad’s FDM-S2.

Anyway. I wanted to know in practice what you can actually do with such a set at a budget price plus mostly free software. The results surprised even me: Properly used, this combination convinced as a quite decent performer on HF! The world map above shows some of the stations received with the set (see insert bottom left) to test its performance.

I laid down my experiences and recommendations for best reception in a paper of 17 multi-media pages full of examples – including 55 screenshots, 21 audio clips and one video. The PDF shows how to optimize reception of broadcast, utility and amateur radio stations. It covers many examples on how to analyze recordings, to decode data transmission with free software plus live decoding of 14 channels in parallel. It also gives some examples of combining HF reception with the internet, e.g. regarding the reception of signals from airplanes (ARINC, HFDL) and vessels (GMDSS).

My experiences really left me enthusiastic about this set.

You may share this enthusiasm and download the PDF of 43 MB here. Save it on your hard disk or USB stick, and open it with a most recent Adobe Reader. Otherwise, the multimedia content will not work.
[Einen deutschsprachigen Test  habe ich jeweils als Titelgeschichte in der April- Ausgabe 2017 der Fachzeitschrift  Radio-Kurier – weltweit hören und in der Mai-Ausgabe der Fachzeitschrift Funktelegramm veröffentlicht.]

Aero: HFDL & flightradar24

The video shows how to combine some software to get and visualize more information from your HFDL monitoring.

HFDL is a data mode, intensively used between air and ground. You can receive these data and decode it with e.g. PC-HFDL software. These data maybe automatically streamed to software PC-HFDL-Display. It takes up to six sources and displays all information neatly in a spread-sheet style.

If you click on the Flight Number in the resulting spread-sheet, website flightradar24 opens up and shows the complete route of this flight, together with many other data.

Note, that not each and every Flight Number is listed on the flightradar24 page. This page relies mainly on position reports on the ADS-B network, transmitted on 1,090 GHz with a range of rarely more than 400 km. Out of this range, HFDL steps in. ADS-B plus HFDL is a charming combination as is the two software and the web service presented in the above video. Click HD button at bottom right there (“Enable HD Quality”) to get the best quality.

ASAPS: HF Prediction online & free!

Flight AF 128 from Paris to Beijing: What is they best time/frequency combination to communicate with Stockholm AOCC on HF?

Flight AF 128 from Paris to Beijing: What is the best time/frequency combination to communicate with Stockholm AOCC on HF en route?

 

HF prediction seems to be a somewhat neglected field among short wave listeners, as well as hams. At the same time, some knowledge of how propagation works on specific paths or into defined areas will greatly enhance your hunting success. If you have considered the somewhat flat learning curve of some software as an obstacle, there now is no excuse. With ASAPS’ recently even more improved online services, you are on the sunny side of HF right now.

I had written a short paper explaining how this free service can be used especially for Utility DXing. If you also ever wanted to know the relation of a waste paper basket and multi path propagation, please download this PDF (7 pages, 22 illustrations) here.

Multi-Channel Monitoring

Matrix_24_RDS

In recent posts, I already wrote about my experiences with Simon Brown’s software SDR Console V3.0. It matches most SDRs, delivers now up to 24 virtual receivers and is capable to run multi instances, i.e. you may run several SDRs on one PC in parallel.

That’s exactly what I did when I connected three SDRs FDM-S2 to a PC, running 35 different ARINC-635 channels in parallel resulting in 68.000 decoded messages. It worked brillantly.

And there is much more, e.g. recording and playing 24 audio channels from broadcasters throughout 20 MHz (the whole FM band!) with hardware RFHack One.

This paper provides a hands-on and step-by-step guide for some vital monitoring tasks like:

  • using up to three receivers on one antenna and one PC
  • working with multi instances of GUIs
  • working with multi instances of software decoders like PC-HFDL and MultiPSK
  • carefully planning a monitoring session
  • analyzing  the decoded results and apply some basic statistics on 68.000+ messages
  • record and play 24 channels incl. RDS data within a bandwidth of 20 MHz on the FM broadcast band plus on HF with RFHack One (see screenshot on top of this page, “Matrix” mode)
  • … and much more

Elad’s Radio Scale & ILG: 31.000+ entries

ILG UTE

The original software for Elad receivers provides a very useful feature, resembling the old radio scale: it inserts some station data from a list on their proper place in the spectrum – see screenshots above (utility) and below (broadcast).

You may invoke several lists like EiBi and your own memories. These list just must comply to the data standard, Elad had set. You may also set up your own list. If you sepcify a transmission time other than 0000-2400, only the stations active at this time will pop up.

With Bernd Friedewald’s (DK9FI) International Listening Guide there is such as matching list available providing 31.000+ entries of brodcast as well as of utility stations. Bernd is a long-time professional in the field of broadcast monitoring and international consulting in this field. You may also edit this list.

ILG BC

(Disclaimer: I have no commercial relationship with ILG, and bought the data like everyone.)

 

Code3-32P: A truly professional Decoder – Tested in the real World

Abbildung 12

HOKA’s Code3-32P is a truly professional decoder in a price class which will fit into most hobby budgets. Together with Roland Proesch’s Frequency Manager it makes an even stronger companion (with your Perseus SDR) in decoding and analyzing many digimodes.

This paper is an introduction into this decoder. It’s written in German, but 17 illustrations plus Google’s Translator will help you.

Nach wie vor ist der Code3-32P von HOKA ein starker Decoder und ein zuverlässiges Analysewerkzeug für Digimodes zu einem verhältnismäßig kleinen Preis. Zusammen mit dem Frequency Manager von Roland Proesch bildet er ein nochmals stärkeres Gespann (dann gemeinsam mit dem Perseus SDR).

Dieses deutschsprachige PDF bietet auf 18 Seiten eine reich illustrierte Einführung in den Code3-32P – mit Beispielen aus der wirklichen Welt, jenseits des Deutschen Wetterdienstes …

FUNcube Dongle PRO: How to get the most out of it, HF-wise

DynamikFCD_E

FUNcube Dongle PRO is an USB stick, containing a great SDR at a low price of around 200 Euros. It makes a fine choice if you are seeking a serious start into the world of HF & SDRs.

I had much fun in gettingout the most of it regarding the HF bands. My enthusiastic experience resulted in this paper: 16 pages with 43 figures showing how to use this great little SDR in receiving, decoding and analyzing. Many aspects are covered, with broadcast, Amateur Radio and Utility DXing only some of them.

The key success factor in the congested HF bands is shifting the quite limited dynamic range to it’s proper place (see Illustration from the paper on top). This simple technique results in stunning reception of even Decoding delicate digital signals of 2.400 baud out of Tahiti in Germany!

This paper explains in detail on how to get the most out of this receiver.

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