Tag Archives: Ham Radio

Steckt sie alle in die Tasche: Reuters “Pocket”

Reuter_Pocket

Burkhard Reuter mit seinem “Pocket”: Eine Entwicklung, auf die er stolz sein kann

Wo eigentlich bleiben die Weltempfänger? Die Spitzenklasse kommt heute nicht aus Japan und schon gar nicht mehr aus den USA oder aus Fürth, sondern aus: Dessau. Dort hat Burkhard Reuter unter anderem seinen Pocket entwickelt. Das ist ein Taschenempfänger, den es auch mit Sendeteil gibt. Seine Leistung ist absolute Spitzenklasse. Sein Konzept folgt einem ab initio selbst entwickelten und “Spectrum Based Signal Processing” genannten Algorithmus. Alles an diesem Gerät ist schlichtweg außergewöhnlich: von der Leistung über die Wertigkeit bis zum Preis. Für die Titelgeschichte der Mai-Ausgabe 2017 der Fachzeitschrift FUNKAMATEUR habe ich Burkhard Reuter in seiner Werkstatt besucht, mir seinen Weg und sein Konzept erläutern lassen sowie seinen Receiver auf Herz und Nieren getestet.

Where have all the world band radios gone? The most recent one – and probably the best ever produced – emerged out of the workshop of Burkhard Reuter (pictured above) from Dessau/Germany, the city of Bauhaus fame. For the cover story (May, 2017) of the German FUNKAMATEUR magazine, I visited him and did an in-depth test of this smart receiver, following his unique “Spectrum Based Signal Processing” algorithm. His Pocket turned out to surpass reception quality of each and every world band radio before, scratching the performance of even professional table top receivers. Some versions of it also include a ham radio transmitter (QRP). Already another modern classics from the Bauhaus city …

 

SDR Transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and Digimode Software FLDIGI

A strong combination: State-of-the-Art SDR transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and digimode software FLDIGI. with this insutrction, the combination of both with audio in/out, keying and freqeuncy transfer is easy.

A strong combination: State-of-the-Art SDR transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and digimode software FLDIGI. With a step-by-step instruction, the combination of both with audio in/out, keying and freqeuncy transfer is easy.

With software-defined radio or SDRs, also ham radio has made a considerable leap forward. SDR transceivers are around for many years but failed to have a major impact until now. Among these transceivers, Russian and German-made Zeus ZS-1 is an outstanding example, covering each amateur radio band from 160 m to 10 m with up to 15 watt output. It received enthusiastic reviews around the world, e.g. by RadCOM of RSGB and QST of ARRL with excellent ratings.

Recently, I again bought on ZS-1 to re-vitalize my amateur radio activity with also again a focus on QRP and digital modes. For this purpose, ZS-1 with its outstanding clean signal under transmit and Receiver plus tidy interface is almost ideal. BUt Ehen I needed a fool-proof instruction to set up the combination of ZS-1 and a multimode software like FLDIGI, I didn’t found what I need: a step-by-step approach.

This was the reason for writing such an instruction by myself. I concentrate on the combination of ZS-1 and FLDIGI which in a PDF is laid out in detail and with instructive screenshots. In an appendix, I go also through some other digimode software like FreeDV and EasyPal. To my own disappointment, I couldn’t get work WSJT/WSPR. So your help is very appreciated!

You can download the 20-paged PDF with its 24 screenshots right here.

 

20 MHz HF: “HackRF One” on Shortwave

world Kopie

The world is full of software-defined radio (SDR), but HackRF One has a rather unique position – thanks to its vast maximum bandwidth of 20 MHz. With an up-converter, this combination covers more than 70 percent of the whole HF range from 3 to 30 MHz. Even better: with proper software you can record and play this enormous band!

However, this stunning bandwidth is achieved by a moderate resolution of 8 bit, resulting in a dynamic range of just nearly 50 dB. Or the half of SDRs like Elad’s FDM-S2.

Anyway. I wanted to know in practice what you can actually do with such a set at a budget price plus mostly free software. The results surprised even me: Properly used, this combination convinced as a quite decent performer on HF! The world map above shows some of the stations received with the set (see insert bottom left) to test its performance.

I laid down my experiences and recommendations for best reception in a paper of 17 multi-media pages full of examples – including 55 screenshots, 21 audio clips and one video. The PDF shows how to optimize reception of broadcast, utility and amateur radio stations. It covers many examples on how to analyze recordings, to decode data transmission with free software plus live decoding of 14 channels in parallel. It also gives some examples of combining HF reception with the internet, e.g. regarding the reception of signals from airplanes (ARINC, HFDL) and vessels (GMDSS).

My experiences really left me enthusiastic about this set.

You may share this enthusiasm and download the PDF of 43 MB here. Save it on your hard disk or USB stick, and open it with a most recent Adobe Reader. Otherwise, the multimedia content will not work.
[Einen deutschsprachigen Test  habe ich jeweils als Titelgeschichte in der April- Ausgabe 2017 der Fachzeitschrift  Radio-Kurier – weltweit hören und in der Mai-Ausgabe der Fachzeitschrift Funktelegramm veröffentlicht.]

Elad’s Radio Scale & ILG: 31.000+ entries

ILG UTE

The original software for Elad receivers provides a very useful feature, resembling the old radio scale: it inserts some station data from a list on their proper place in the spectrum – see screenshots above (utility) and below (broadcast).

You may invoke several lists like EiBi and your own memories. These list just must comply to the data standard, Elad had set. You may also set up your own list. If you sepcify a transmission time other than 0000-2400, only the stations active at this time will pop up.

With Bernd Friedewald’s (DK9FI) International Listening Guide there is such as matching list available providing 31.000+ entries of brodcast as well as of utility stations. Bernd is a long-time professional in the field of broadcast monitoring and international consulting in this field. You may also edit this list.

ILG BC

(Disclaimer: I have no commercial relationship with ILG, and bought the data like everyone.)

 

Ham Radio: Intruder Watch, State of the Art. Oder: Bandwacht nach dem Stand der Technik.

IntruderWatch_Workflow1

HF spectrum is precious. Each user has to obey specific rule – of ITU and his own country. For best communications, there have been assigned exclusive band for different user groups. The amateur radio bands for hams are among them.

“Intruder Watch” is to look out for stations which do have no legitimation to transmit on the frequencies they use. These signals can originate from broadcasters, bad transmitters with their fundamental on a legitimate frequency, broadcast, military (OTHR RADAR!), diplomatic …

Amateur radio with it’s relatively small transmitters and antennas is especially prone to be disturbed by intruders. SDRs, software and a specific workflow (see illustration on top of this page) offer an as easy as complete monitoring of such bands on a 24/7 base at low costs.

This paper shows how that can be done: monitoring and analyzing on a professional level.

Professionelles Monitoring spürt zuverlässig sämtliche Bandeindringlinge in Frequenzbereichen auf, wo diese nicht hingehören. Das ist, sogar auf 24/7-Basis, auch mit Amateurmitteln möglich. Das Werkzeug sind ein SDR, Software und ein spezifischer Arbeitsprozess.

Hier kannst Du das Paper auch auf Deutsch lesen, wie alles funktioniert – Schritt für Schritt.

The best Digimodes: Test reveals surprising results

Disturbed

Digital communications with digimodes is a very efficient tool of HF communications. Hams are using RTTY for decades. Since the advent of PSK31 in late 1998, there have been developed a lot of digimodes with special applications in mind. Albeit, RTTY and PSK31 are still very popular.

When I asked myself: “What’s the best mode?”, I couldn’t get a reliable answer. And, really, it depends.

As a result, I made a setup for testing some chat modes on HF channels which are very much different from just flat noisy (AWGN) channels. The results were very much surprising: There are by far better alternatives to RTTY and PSK31 (see table above, reflecting some of the results).

This paper deals with setting up a real-world testbed and presents some results. Anyone is welcomed to replicate the test and/or extend it with other modes. Recent software of W1JHK has made the workflow much easier and faster since then.

FUNcube Dongle PRO: How to get the most out of it, HF-wise

DynamikFCD_E

FUNcube Dongle PRO is an USB stick, containing a great SDR at a low price of around 200 Euros. It makes a fine choice if you are seeking a serious start into the world of HF & SDRs.

I had much fun in gettingout the most of it regarding the HF bands. My enthusiastic experience resulted in this paper: 16 pages with 43 figures showing how to use this great little SDR in receiving, decoding and analyzing. Many aspects are covered, with broadcast, Amateur Radio and Utility DXing only some of them.

The key success factor in the congested HF bands is shifting the quite limited dynamic range to it’s proper place (see Illustration from the paper on top). This simple technique results in stunning reception of even Decoding delicate digital signals of 2.400 baud out of Tahiti in Germany!

This paper explains in detail on how to get the most out of this receiver.