Category Archives: SDR

Ghosts in the Air Glow: HAARP on March 26th, 2019

Just after the spring equinox, interdisciplinary artist Amanda Dawn Christie did another performance of her ionospheric transmission art project “Ghosts in the Air Glow” via the High Frequency Active Auroral Project HAARP near Gakona/Alaska. I took an HF recording of a range, covering all frequencies and times scheduled – see here. At my location, on March 26th, 2019, reception was possible only on 5.100 kHz (best), 6.900 kHz, 7.900 kHz and 8.000 kHz. Signal strength was too low to hear any modulation, but the characteristics of the signals did exactly match the schedule – see screenshots and captions below.

Receiver: Elad’s FDM-S2, Antenna: Active Dipole MD-300DX (2 x 2.5 m), Software: V3 from Simon Brown


5.100 kHz, 01:16 to 01:26 UTC, West beam, gave the best signal.
The signal on 6.900 kHz on the East beam from 01:16 to 01:26 UTC was considerably lower.
On 7.900 kHz, the signal was transmitted by an electronically rotated beam, one rotation per minute, from 01:03 to 01:09 UTC on the West beam. This is clearly seen on the the Signal window below the spectrogram.
On 7.900 kHz, the signal was transmitted by an electronically rotated beam, two rotations per minute, from 01:09:30 to 01:15:30 UTC on the West beam. This is clearly seen on the the Signal window below the spectrogram.
On 8.000 kHz, the signal was transmitted by an electronically rotated beam, one rotation per minute, from 01:03 to 01:09 UTC on the East beam. This is clearly seen on the the Signal window below the spectrogram.
On 8.000 kHz, the signal was transmitted by an electronically rotated beam, two rotations per minute, from 01:09:30 to 01:15:30 UTC on the East beam. This is clearly seen on the the Signal window below the spectrogram.

Visualizing HF Networks

G-VIFT

A flight of G-VFIT from Atlanta to Heathrow, and its HFDL communications – visualized by GEPHI.

Gephi does it

Each communications has a structure. Visualization reveals this structure. This is also valid for HF communications with its networks with different stations, (even moving) locations, hierarchy …

Recently, I made my first steps with free visualization software GEPHI to get a deeper look into some aeronautical networks. The graph at the top shows the gephi’ed result of 125+ HFDL messages, transmitted by a flight of G-VFIT from Atlanta to Heathrow. I monitored six HFDL channels in parallel, one channel from New York, two from Shannon, and three from Reykjavik.

Each point represents a message, tagged by its time in UTC. The positions of the points are geo-referenced, as I used HFDL messages containing these information.

Wheras the longitude’s positions are to scale, their latitude’s positions had been spread for better reading.

This visualization shows that Reykjavik on 6.712 kHz did the main work. But it is surprising that the first contact just leaving the U.S. coast was made with Shannon, and not with nearby New York.

GEPHI also helps in visualizing the hiearchy of networks, see screenshot below:


In the Russian Aero Net on 4.712 kHz, Rostov plays a pivotal role.

Here the strength of the connecting lines and the position of the city’s names represents to hierarchy of this network, i.e. who is calling whom, and how often. There are several strongholds like Rostov, Yekaterinburg and Samara, but also some mere outposts like Novosibirsk and Syktyvkar.

This picture isn’t geo-, but social-referenced, to say so: you know that e.g. Chelyabinsk on the left is geographically situated east of Rostov. You may also geo-reference these data, turn it into a kml file and see it in Google Maps of Open Street Map. If the co-ordinates are correct, zooming will take you exactly to the feeding point of each of their Nadenenko dipole, see below …

The above visualized hierarchy has been changed here into a geo-referenced kml file, opened in Google Earth.

There are many more applications of such a great tool for visualization which will further enrich monitoring.

TDoA Direction Finding: First Experiences on the KiwiSDR Net

6465_5

With some iteration, as described in the PDF, the former unknown site of a CIS-12 transmission on 6.465 kHz has been disclosed as the Russian Navy from Baltysk, Kaliningrad.

The stunning direction finding tool on the KiwiSDR net has hit the community. Most people are enthusiastic about the new horizons, some some smart people had opened for free.

A few people, however, reported some disappointment as they couldn’t pinpoint each and every transmitter with expected high precision.

To avoid this disappointment, you have to know what you are doing. The TDoA tool for direction finding indeed delivers automatically stunning results. But you have to think a bit about the setup, and also do some iteration.

I wrapped up my first experiences with TDoA in this PDF. You may simply download it by double-clicking the link, and open it in a PDF reader. It consists of 22 pages and 37 instructive figures. I greatly stressed the practical part of direction finding with this tool – with 13 explicit case studies from 2,6 MHz to 15,6 MHz.

The idea is to have more fun by getting the most reliable results.

SDR Console V3: New and indispensable Software

V3_Dimtsi

“Living Sonagram”: On the right window, you see a part of a 24 h recording at 6,1 MHz bandwidth (ca. 2 TB) with 1 line/second. Tagged is the sign on of Dimtsi Hafash which is received by the undocked “Receive” panel of V3’s GUI. At the bottom: signal strength on 7180 kHz over 24 hours reveals e.g. s/on, s/off and fade in.

Just a small note on a real real big event: Simon Brown, G4ELI, has published V3 of his indispensable SDR Console software on June 18th, 2018 – after three and a half years of heavy coding. Download it here and donate. Or vice versa.

V3 is a quite universal software for most SDRs on the market. For all, it provides the same graphical user interface (GUI) and the same functions (plus those specific to some devices).

All

DXer’s delight: On top the sonagram to visually catch signals (here: JDG from Diego Garcia; tagged). Bottom, from left to right: receive GUI for fine tuning, decoder W-Code showing “JDG”, below this “Playback” panel for controlling the recording (back/forward, e.g.), and on the right a database.

There are many unique functions and modules which will take DXing with SDRs to the next step. For now, let me mention just two of them:

  • 24 parallel demodulators within the SDR’s bandwidth – fully independent in e.g. mode, bandwidth and AGC to receive, record and decode 24 signals/channels in parallel.
  • a sophisticated File Analyser  which presents a recorded band as “living sonagram” – whre you see and click to a signal which then is played via the basic GUI

6pane

Up to six parallel demodulators can be seen on the main screen (from up to 24 possible).

 

1520

1520 kHz from 18:00 to 05:00 UTC (local SR/SS: 19:43/02:58 UTC) with 100 Hz bandwidth and 0,0031 Hz resolution (= +65 dB over 10 kHz!) reveals at least 27 stations and their offsets.

Each of these just two features mentioned will open new worlds for DXing and even serious professional monitoring. I will be happy to come back to some applications of V3 in more detail.

Thank you very much, Simon, for providing this excellent tool for free!

4800

4’800 kHz: First CNR1 with sign on at 20:15 UTC and fade out, then AIR Hyderabad with the same, but s/on around 00:06 UTC.

 

7435kHz

You may export levels over time on one frequency or level over frequencies at a given time. This graph visualizes the activity on 7435 kHz with 86’400 levels (on per second over 24 h). The data had been exported to QtiPlot for further investigation.

Einführung SDR: Kompakt, praxisnah, verständlich

Wer eine konzentrierte, praxisnahe und verständliche Einführung in die Technik Software-definierter Empfänger (SDR) sucht, der findet alles dazu in einem 28-seitigen und deutschsprachigen PDF von Hayati Ayguen.

Nach der spannenden Lektüre kennt man die Chancen ebenso wie die Grenzen von SDRs, kann die Prospektdaten und vollmundigen Werbeversprechen vor allem der großen Hersteller von Amateurfunkgeräten besser einordnen und lernt somit auch die Leistung sowie den Funktionsumfang der Produkte kleinerer Hersteller noch stärker schätzen.

Einen ersten Überblick bietet Hayati auch auf Folien.

INMARSAT: Decoding 12 Aero-channels in parallel

Jaero12

Action: Free software allows for decoding twelve INMARSAT in parallel

A recent post in Carl’s rtl-sdr-blog informed about the ebay-lability of some surplus Outernet patch antennas for just – see here. For just 29 US-$, I got this small antenna with integrated SAW filter (1525 – 1559 MHz) plus LNA. A real bait for me to jump over the limit of 30 MHz reception! Soon I fired up my AirSpy R2 receiver, providing the LNA with power supply (Bias-Tee). It worked fine, and I received a whole bunch of excellent signals by this setup.

As I wanted to receive some aircraft information, so I downloaded free JAERO decoder of Jonathan “Jonti” Olds, also from New Zealand. This fine software can be opened in many instances. In combination with the up to 24 decoders of SDR-Console V3 of Simon Brown, this modest setup turned into a multi-channel satellite reception post.

AeroGUI

Here 12 decoders had been assigned – one on each INMARSAT channel. You see also quite good SNRs from the Outernet patch antenna.

Next steps worked as usual with the mutli-channel approach:

  • make up 12 channels in SDR-Console and tune each channel to a different signal. Mode must be USB, and as bandwidth I choose 1200 Hz for 600 bps and 2400 Hz for 1200 bps channels. That’s a bit wider than necessary, but doing so there is some room for the AFC in JAERO decoder always to stick to the signal even if the SDR should drift a bit over 24 h or so
  • The output of each channel is then routed to a different Virtual Audio Cable, or VAC 1-12.
  • Then you have to install twelve instances of JAERO software in different folders, e.g. JAERO 1-12. You should name each JAERO.exe file accordingly, e.g. JAERO_1.exe to JAERO12.exe.
  • Open JAERO_1.exe, assign its input to VAC 1, and set the matching speed of the signal. If all is ok, you will be rewarded by a sharp phase constellation, and soon decoding will start.
  • Repeat the above steps until you have reached JAERO_12.exe, connected to VAC 12.

12Matrix

The “Matrix” of SDR-Console V3 shows the twelve channels with different signal strengths and width, depending on the data rate (600bps/narrow, 1200bps/wide).

The result can bee seen from the screenshot at the top of this page. The whole setup ran stable and unattended for hours.

Thanks for all smart people having developed the smart software and hardware!

SDR-Netz des DARC e.V.: Rauschende Ergebnisse

R2T2_Braunschweig_ANT1

Einfach vergleichen: Oben CHU 14.670 kHz an einem Remote-Standort des DARC e.V., unten zur selben Zeit an einem durchschnittlichen Standort.

Aus den Mitteln seiner “Mitgliedschaft Pro” bestellte der DARC e.V. im Jahre 2014 sein Web-SDR-Transceivernetz. Es soll seinen Mitgliedern “weltweiten Funkbetrieb aus dem heimischen Shack ermöglichen”. Jeder der über 1.000 DARC-Ortsvereine war aufgerufen, sich als einer der zwölf Standorte zu bewerben. Gesucht waren solche Locations, die vor allem einen störungsarmen Empfang und gute Antennenmöglichkeiten bieten – was der Funkamateur in der Stadt eben nicht hat.

Obwohl die R2T2 genannten Geräte für über 25.000 Euro längst ausgeliefert wurden, ist es bedauerlicherweise merkwürdig still um dieses schöne Projekt geworden; auch die zugehörige Yahoo-Newsgroup scheint nicht mehr ansprechbar zu sein.

Wie also ist der von außen (ich bin kein Mitglied des DARC e.V., begrüße aber dieses Vorhaben uneingeschränkt!) sichtbare Stand des Projektes?

Um das zu erkunden, habe ich am 20.12.2017 alle verfügbaren Remote-Standorte (sechs, und die auch lediglich empfangsseitg ansprechbar) mit dem Empfang “im heimischen Shack” – leider einer ziemlich durchschnittlichen Location – verglichen.

Die ersten Ergebnisse habe ich in einem PDF zusammengefasst, das ihr hier unter R2T2 herunterladen könnt.

Diese Versuche wurden zur Vervollständigung des Bildes fortgesetzt – siehe unten. So nahm ich am  21.12. um 07:45 UTC einen Vergleich auf 17.950 kHz vor, wo bei mir der Rundfunksender China Radio International/Kashgar mit einem SNR von gut 31 dB einfiel: bis auf ein sehr schwaches und praktisch unverständliches Signal vom Remote-Standort Wiblishauserhof war auf den anderen Remote-SDRs des DARC so gut wie nichts zu hören, zum Teil wegen (lokaler?) Störungen. Unten der Vergleich meiner Station (unten)  mit dem bayerischen Remote-SDR (oben).

r2t2_Bayern_17950

Vergleich China Radio International, 17.950 kHz: oben der bayerische SDR des DARC-Remote-Netzes, unten dieselbe Station zur selben Zeit am Standort DK8OK.

Einen weiteren Test unternahm ich am 26.12.2017 gegen 12:30 UTC auf 1.521 kHz (CRI/Kashgar, Nähe zum 160-m-Band) und auf 4.800 kHz (China National Radio 1/Golmud). Diesmal erfolgte der Vergleich an einer Aktivantenne (statt der Quadloop)  meinerseits, die bei beiden Stationen eine Empfangsqualität von SIO 253 bot.
In beiden Fällen war das Ergebnis ähnlich: von den sechs verfügbaren Remote-SDRs konnte drei die Stationen überhaupt nicht empfangen. Eine weitere lag knapp über der Hörschwelle, Schöppingen zog fast gleichauf, während Wiblishauserhof in etwa Gleichstand mit meiner Anlage bot – als einzige Station von zwölf bezahlten/geplanten. Für gut drei Jahre Bauzeit und über 25.000 Euro Investment ein Befund mit durchaus Luft nach oben.

Eine Fortsetzung derartiger Vergleiche scheint daher solange sinnlos, wie das DARC-Netz nicht erweitert bzw. Standort/Antennen/SDRs entscheidend geändert werden.

Was hingegen engagierte Hobbyhörer ehrenamtlich und mit allein privatem Geld im Gegensatz zum “Bundesverband für den Amateurfunkdienst” der staatlich geprüften Hobbyfunker zustande bringen, zeigt – ebenfalls mit 14-Bit-SDRs – das leistungsstarke Kiwi-Netz.

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