Monthly Archives: October 2016

SDR Transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and Digimode Software FLDIGI

A strong combination: State-of-the-Art SDR transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and digimode software FLDIGI. with this insutrction, the combination of both with audio in/out, keying and freqeuncy transfer is easy.

A strong combination: State-of-the-Art SDR transceiver Zeus ZS-1 and digimode software FLDIGI. With a step-by-step instruction, the combination of both with audio in/out, keying and freqeuncy transfer is easy.

With software-defined radio or SDRs, also ham radio has made a considerable leap forward. SDR transceivers are around for many years but failed to have a major impact until now. Among these transceivers, Russian and German-made Zeus ZS-1 is an outstanding example, covering each amateur radio band from 160 m to 10 m with up to 15 watt output. It received enthusiastic reviews around the world, e.g. by RadCOM of RSGB and QST of ARRL with excellent ratings.

Recently, I again bought on ZS-1 to re-vitalize my amateur radio activity with also again a focus on QRP and digital modes. For this purpose, ZS-1 with its outstanding clean signal under transmit and Receiver plus tidy interface is almost ideal. BUt Ehen I needed a fool-proof instruction to set up the combination of ZS-1 and a multimode software like FLDIGI, I didn’t found what I need: a step-by-step approach.

This was the reason for writing such an instruction by myself. I concentrate on the combination of ZS-1 and FLDIGI which in a PDF is laid out in detail and with instructive screenshots. In an appendix, I go also through some other digimode software like FreeDV and EasyPal. To my own disappointment, I couldn’t get work WSJT/WSPR. So your help is very appreciated!

You can download the 20-paged PDF with its 24 screenshots right here.

 

PC-HFDL Display: Receive, decode and analyze the biggest net on HF!

HFDL is a net for data communications between airplanes and ground. The results can be shown on Google Earth . This screenshot shows a part of 29.000+ entries, received and processed on August 15th, 2016.

HFDL is a net for data communications between airplanes and ground. The results can be shown on Google Earth. This screenshot shows a part of 29.000+ entries, received and processed on August 15th, 2016.

 

Communications between air and ground is mostly done on VHF, UHF and SHF. But if an aircraft is out of reach of a ground station station due to the limited “radio horizon” of these bands, it has to maintain communications by either satellite or HF. This HFDL net is in fact the most massive professional user of HF right now. Within 24 hours, I get more than 40.000 live messages with a modest equipment.

With his software Display Launcher, Mike Simpson from Australia provides a most valuable tool to analyze up to nine channels in parallel. His software also draws positions and routes onto Google Earth. Mike has spent much energy on coping with many inconsistencies of transmitted data before it all really goes smoothly.

This free software is the vital part of a monitoring project to receive, demodulate and analyze live up to nine HFDL channels in parallel. Other ingredients you need is a software-defined radio (SDR), nine virtual audio cables (in fact, a piece of software) and a decoder software. Don’t forget an antenna and a PC …

This setup comprises a semi-professional monitoring station which will allow you to receive and track many of the nearly 3.000 airplanes using HFDL. This also covers the military, business jets, helicopters and some other delicate users. It maybe used as an important complement to Flightradar24’s web service, whenever their VHF/UHF/SHF-based net is out of range of the aircraft. This is particularly true over vast water masses like oceans and sparsely populated land masses. Furthermore, Flightradar24 erases some sensible flights from the raw material before publication on their website. This is clearly no “censorship”, but some thoughtfulness in regard to those countries where reception and publication of HFDL data is more tolerated than explicitly encouraged by the government.

In a 9-page PDF, I published a step-by-step recipe on how to set up such an HF monitoring station for up to nine parallel HFDL channel. You can download it here.